Information for men who have been affected by sexual violence

This section is for gay and bisexual men who have been affected by sexual violence. Our aim is to provide a brief overview of the basics and to help you navigate the service who can provide support.

If you’ve been the victim of rape or sexual assault and are looking for support, then by visiting this website, you’ve already made the first step in your journey towards moving on.

Sexual violence is an issue which is still commonly misunderstood; our Myths and Realities page looks at some of the common assumptions people make about men, rape and sexual assault.

Sexual violence is a complex issue which impacts on the lives of victims in very different ways, but there are some common reactions, which we’ll help you to get to grips with here.

Whatever point you’re at in your journey towards moving on, we want you to know that you’re not alone; there is support out there if you’d like it, and things can get better.

If by reading this information you decide that you would like our support, then please don’t hesitate to get in touch with us on 0845 3 30 30 30 or email counselling@lgf.org.uk.

Understanding Sexual Violence

Being the victim of any form of sexual violence can be horrific and devastating. For some men, understanding what things mean can help them to make steps towards talking about what has happened.

Having said this, many people find that following a trauma they are unable to remember, so please don’t be alarmed if this is the case.

Sexual Violence

Sexual violence is a general term that includes many acts such as sexual assault, sexual harassment, rape, sexual exploitation and sexual slavery/prostitution.

This is an issue that can and does happen to men regardless of their age, sexual orientation, size, strength or appearance and absolutely no one deserves to be victimised.

Sexual Assault

Sexual assault is any sexual contact that is against a person’s will or without consent. This may be because of force, violence, manipulation or where the victim has been too intoxicated or too scared to give consent.

Assault Penetration

An assault on a male will be classed as assault penetration if a male or female penetrates the anus without their consent.

The offence is committed where the penetration is by a part of the body (for example, a finger) or anything else (for example, a bottle) for sexual intent.

Rape

According to the Sexual Offences Act (2003), it is classed as rape (for men) when the anus or mouth is intentionally penetrated by the perpetrator’s penis without consent. It is also classed as rape if the perpetrator continued to penetrate you after you withdrew consent.

It is not relevant what relationship, if any, the perpetrator has or had with you, or if the perpetrator is your partner.